Latin name: Pinus nigra

Common name: Austrian pine

40 m. 131,2 f.
Family: Pinaceae

Synonyms: Pinus austriaca, Pinus nigra austriaca

Genus: Pinus

Genus of more than 110 species of conifers, from which there have been developed numerous conifers.
Evergreen plants with slightly fragrant, needle-like foliage. Needles are are borne in a spiral phyllotaxy in clusters (fascicles) of 1,2,3,5, each fascicle produced from a bud like a basal sheath. Needles are semi-circular or triangular. Fruits are cones.
Pines require full sun and do well even in poor soils.
Dwarf varieties are used in rock gardens and arrangements. Trees are used as specimens in big gardens or in clusters.
Pines are subject to the pine caterpillar (thaumetopoea pityocampa), to Bacillus thuringiesis and to the sap-feeding insect Marchalina hellenica, which can be biologically fought via the predatory insect Neuleucopis kartliana.
Typical species are propagated by seeds that germinate easily in spring at 20°C (68°F).
Propagate cultivars by grafting or by semi-woody cuttings by fingernail in summer and autumn.
Latin name: Pinus nigra
Species with scabrous, yellow-black-tipped needles (hence the name), in fascicles of two. Tree with conical crown and green foliage. Semi-sciophyte species with moderate requirements in water.